Monthly Archives: August 2015

Google Webmaster Central Blog 2015-08-31 18:02:00

With the new Search Analytics API, it’s now time to gradually say goodbye to the old CSV download scripts for information on queries & rankings. We’ll be turning off access to these downloads on October 20, 2015. These download scripts have helpe… Continue reading Continue reading

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Real-Time Data Validation with Google Tag Assistant Recordings

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: great analytics can only happen with great data.  
That’s why we’ve made it a priority to help our users confirm that their data is top-quality. Last year we released our automated data diagnostics feature, and now we’re proud to announce the launch of another powerful new feature: Google Tag Assistant Recordings.  
This tool helps you instantly validate your Google Analytics or Google Analytics Premium implementation. If it finds data quality issues, it helps you troubleshoot them and then recheck them on the spot.  It’s available as part of the Google Tag Assistant Chrome Extension.

Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 2.27.31 PM.png

“Tag Assistant Recordings is fast becoming one of my favorite tools for debugging Google Analytics Premium installations!  I use it multiple times a day with my Premium clients to help explain odd trends in their data or debug configuration issues. Already I’m building it into my core workflow.” 
- Dan Rowe, Director of Analytics at Analytics Pros
What can I use it for?
Tag Assistant Recordings works with all kinds of data events: purchases, logins, and so on. What if you sell flowers online and want to confirm that Enhanced Ecommerce is capturing the checkout flow correctly? With Tag Assistant Recordings, you can record yourself going through the checkout process as you buy a dozen red roses, and then review what Google Analytics captured.

If you find that your account isn’t set up properly — if the sale wasn’t recorded or was mis-labeled — you can make adjustments and test it all over again instantly.  With Tag Assistant Recordings, you know you’re capturing all the data that’s important to you.
Tag Assistant Recordings can be particularly useful when (1) you’re in the process of implementing Google Analytics or Google Analytics Premium, (2) you’ve recently made updates to your site, or (3) you’re making changes to your Google Analytics or Google Analytics Premium configuration. It works even if your new site or your updates aren’t visible to the public yet, so you can feel confident before you go live.
Tag Assistant Recordings can also help if you want to reconfigure your Google Analytics account to better reflect your business.  For example, you may want to configure multi-channel funnels to detect your AdWords channel.  Tag Assistant Recordings lets you set up this new functionality in Google Analytics and test immediately whether everything is working as you expect.  
“Tag Assistant Recordings has already been a HUGE help! Analytics Pros and About.com were working on an issue with sessions double-counting and Tag Assistant Recordings let us narrow down precisely which hits were having new sessions counted. It saved us hours of time and helped us jump right to where the problem was. So, in summary, this is awesome!”  

- Greg McDonald, Business Intelligence Analyst at About.com
How does it work?
Tag Assistant Recordings works through the Google Tag Assistant Chrome Extension, so you’ll need to download the extension if you aren’t already using it.  From there, setup is easy.  Simply open Google Tag Assistant, record the user flow you’d like to check, and then view the full report in Tag Assistant.  You’ll want to view both tabs in the report (Tag Assistant and Google Analytics) to verify that you see the intended tags.  Keep in mind that the Google Analytics data is only available if you have access to the appropriate property or view.

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Here’s a nifty bonus: If you find a problem, and you think you have fixed it by changing settings from within Google Analytics, return to the Google Analytics tab in Tag Assistant Recordings and click the “Update” button. You’ll see instantly how your configuration changes would have affected this recording.
We hope that Google Tag Assistant will be a valuable new tool in your analytics toolkit.  
Why not start using it today?


Posted by:  Ajay Nainani, Frank Kieviet, and Jocelyn Whittenburg, Google Analytics team

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#NoHacked: Fixing the Injected Gibberish URL Hack

Today in our #NoHacked campaign, we’ll be discussing how to fix the injected gibberish URL hack we wrote about last week. Even if your site is not infected with this specific type of hack, many of these steps can be helpful for fixing other types of hacks. Follow along with discussions on Twitter and Google+ using the #NoHacked tag. (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4)


Temporarily Take your Site Offline

Taking your site offline temporarily will prevent your site’s visitors from going to hacked pages and give you time to properly fix your site. If you keep your site online, you run the risk of getting compromised again as you clean up your site.

Treating your Site

The next few steps require you to be comfortable making technical changes to your site. If you aren’t familiar or comfortable enough with your site to make these changes, it might be best to consult with or hire someone who is. However, reading through these steps will still be helpful.

Before you start fixing your site, we advise that you back up your site. (This backed up version will still contain hacked content and should only be used if you accidentally remove a critical file.) If you’re unsure how to back up your site, ask your hosting provider for assistance or consult your content management system (CMS) documentation. As you work through the steps, any time you remove a file, make sure to keep a copy of the file as well.

Checking your .htaccess file

In order to manipulate your site, this type of hack creates or alters the contents of your .htaccess file. If you’re not sure where to find your .htaccess file, consult your server or CMS documentation.

Check the contents of your .htaccess file for any suspicious content. If you’re not sure how to interpret the contents of the .htaccess file, you can read about it on the Apache.org documentation, ask in a help forum, or you can consult an expert. Here is an example of a .htaccess modified by this hack:

  • <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> 
  •   RewriteEngine On  
  •   #Visitors that visit your site from Google will be redirected  
  •   RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} google\.com 
  •   #Visitors are redirected to a malicious PHP file called happypuppy.php 
  •   RewriteRule (.*pf.*) /happypuppy.php?q=$1 [L] 
  • </IfModule>


Identifying other malicious files

The most common types of files that are modified or injected by this hack are JavaScript and PHP files. Hackers typically take two approaches: The first is to insert new PHP or JavaScript files on your server. The inserted files can sometimes be named something very similar to a legitimate file on your site like wp-cache.php versus the legitimate file wp_cache.php. The second approach is to alter legitimate files on your server and insert malicious content into these files. For example, if you have a template or plugin JavaScript file on your site, hackers might add malicious JavaScript to the file.

For example, on www.example.com a malicious file named happypuppy.php, identified earlier in the .htaccess file, was injected into a folder on the site. However, the hackers also corrupted a legitimate JavaScript file called json2.js by adding malicious code to the file. Here is an example of a corrupted json2.js file. The malicious code is highlighted in red and has been added to the very bottom of the json2.js file:

To effectively track down malicious files, you’ll need to understand the function of the JavaScript and PHP files on your site. You might need to consult your CMS documentation to help you. Once you know what the files do, you should have an easier time tracking down malicious files that don’t belong on your site.

Also, check your site for any recently modified files. Template files that have been modified recently should be thoroughly investigated. Tools that can help you interpret obfuscated PHP files can be found in the Appendix.

Removing malicious content

As mentioned previously, back up the contents of your site appropriately before you remove or alter any files. If you regularly make backups for your site, cleaning up your site might be as easy as restoring a clean backed-up version.

However, if you do not regularly back up your site, you have a few alternatives. First, delete any malicious files that have been inserted on your site. For example, on www.example.com, you would delete the happypuppy.php file. For corrupted PHP or JavaScript files like json2.js, you’ll have to upload a clean version of those files to your site. If you use a CMS, consider reloading a fresh copy of the core CMS and plugin files on your site.

Identifying and Fixing the Vulnerability

Once you’ve removed the malicious file, you’ll want to track down and fix the vulnerability that allowed your site to be compromised, or you risk your site being hacked again. The vulnerability could be anything from a stolen password to outdated web software. Consult Google Webmaster Hacked Help for ways to identify and fix the vulnerability. If you’re unable to figure out how your site was compromised, you should change your passwords for all your login credentials,update all your web software, and seriously consider getting more help to make sure everything is ok.

Next Steps

Once you’re done cleaning your site, use the Fetch as Google tool to check if the hacked pages still appear to Google. Don’t forget to check your home page for hacked content as well. If the hacked content is gone, then, congratulations, your site should be clean! If the Fetch as Google tool is still seeing hacked content on those hacked pages, you still have work to do. Check again for any malicious PHP or JavaScript files you might have missed.

Bring your site back online as soon as you’re sure your site is clean and the vulnerability has been fixed. If there was a manual action on your site, you’ll want to file a reconsideration request in Search Console. Also, think about ways to protect your site from future attacks. You can read more about how to secure your site from future attacks in the Google Hacked Webmaster Help Center.

We hope this post has helped you gain a better understanding of how to fix your site from the injected gibberish URL hack. Be sure to follow our social campaigns and share any tips or tricks you might have about staying safe on the web with the #nohacked hashtag.

If you have any additional questions, you can post in the Webmaster Help Forums where a community of webmasters can help answer your questions. You can also join our Hangout on Air about Security on August 26.

Appendix

These are tools that may be useful. Google doesn’t run or support them.

PHP Decoder, UnPHP: Hackers will often distort PHP files to make them harder to read. Use these tools to clean up the PHP files so you understand better what the PHP file is doing.

Posted by: Eric Kuan, Webmaster Relations Specialist & Yuan Niu, Webspam Analyst

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Affiliate Attribution: Putting the Pieces Together

Originally Posted on the Adometry M2R Blog

Recently I was reminded of an article from a little while back, titled, “2013: The Year of Affiliate Attribution?” It’s an interesting take and worthwhile read for those interested in affiliate marketing and the associated measurement challenges. Given that some time has passed, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at progress to date towards realizing a more holistic and accurate view of affiliate performance as part of a comprehensive cross-channel strategy.

Most affiliate managers have a similar goal to manage affiliate holistically, meaning investing in those that predominantly drive net-new customers independent of other paid marketing investments. Ultimately, this model allows them to optimize CPA by managing commissions, coupon discounts, and brand appropriateness based on true “incremental value” provided to business. Unfortunately, due to a lack of transparency and inadequate measurement, many marketers find themselves short of this goal. The result is the ongoing nagging question, “Is my affiliate strategy working and am I overpaying for what I’m getting?”

Why ‘Affiliate Attribution’ Is Hard

Affiliate marketers’ challenges range from competing against affiliates in PPC ad programs to concerns about questionable business practices employed by some “opportunistic” affiliates offering marginal value, but still receiving credit for sales that likely would have happened regardless. Which brings us to the central question:

How do marketers determine how much credit an affiliate should receive?

As you may know, opinions about how much conversion credit affiliates deserve for any given transaction vary widely. While there are a number of factors that influence affiliate performance (e.g. where they appear in the sales funnel, industry/sector, time-to-purchase length, etc.) for most brands the attribution model that is utilized will have a significant impact on which affiliates are over- and under-valued.

For example, in a last-click world affiliates that enter the purchase path towards the bottom of the funnel often hold their own; yet, when brands begin measuring on a full-funnel basis incorporating impression data, many struggle to prove their incremental value as the consumer has many exposures to marketing long before they reach the affiliate site. Conversely, affiliates that act predominantly as top- or mid-funnel (content, loyalty, etc.) are usually undervalued using last-click but can garner more credit using a full-funnel, data-driven attribution methodology. I should also mention these are broad generalizations only meant as examples, and it’s not necessarily a zero-sum game.
Another challenge is that fractional, data-driven attribution is difficult to implement for some types of promotions. One instance of this is cash back, loyalty and reward sites that must know an exact commission amount they will receive for each transaction so that they can pass on discounts to members. Given the complexity of more sophisticated attribution models, this data isn’t readily available.
Lastly, there several organizational challenges that inhibit the use of data-driven attribution among affiliate marketers. Some industry experts have indicated that many publishers, as much as 70-80%, strip impression tracking code from affiliate URLs. Another measurement challenge we see frequently is brands managing affiliates at the channel level leaving little sub-channel categorization which is where significant optimization opportunities exist.
Affiliate Attribution and the Performance Marketing Goldmine
Of course, part of our work at Adometry is helping customers address these challenges (and more) to ensure they are measuring affiliate contributions accurately and able to take appropriate action based on fully-attributed results.
Some key advantages of using data-driven attribution to measure affiliate sales include:
  • The ability to create a unified framework to compare performance (clicks and Impressions) in which affiliates compete for budgets on equal footing,
  • Increased visibility into which publishers are truly driving net-new customers through specifying which are an integral part of a multi-touch path and which are expendable,
  • The knowledge required to implement a Publisher category taxonomy to allow more insights into how different types of publishers perform by funnel stage and areas to improve efficiency,
  • Insight into the true incremental value publishers are providing and the offering commission rates to reflect this actual value,
  • A better understanding of affiliate’s role in the overall mix, further informing marketers use of complementary tactics to maximize affiliate contributions in concert with other channels,
  • The ability to use actual performance data to counter myths and frustrations with affiliates (cookie stuffing, stealing conversions, etc.)
Taken separately, each of these represents a significant opportunity to both be more effective in how you identify and utilize affiliate attribution to drive new opportunities. Together, they represent a fundamental improvement in how you manage your overall marketing spending, strategic planning and optimization efforts.
Top-performing affiliates, particularly those at the top and middle of the funnel, also stand to benefit from more transparent, accurate and fair system for crediting conversions. In fact, several large-scale, forward-thinking affiliates are already investing in data-driven attribution to arm themselves with the data required to effectively compete and win business in the market as brands become more sophisticated and judicious with their affiliates budgets.
It’s an exciting time for performance marketing. Change is always hard, but in this case it’s absolutely change for the better.  And frankly, its time.  What are your thoughts and experiences with measuring affiliate performance and attribution?

Posted by Casey Carey, Google Analytics team

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Google Analytics User Conference: G’day Australia

The Australian Google Analytics User Conference is worth clearing your diaries for, with some of the most well-known and respected international industry influencers making their way to Sydney and Melbourne to present at the conference this September.


Hosted by Google Certified Partners, Loves Data, you’ll be learning about the latest features, what’s trending and popular, best practices and uncovering ways to get the most out of Google Analytics. Topics covered include: making sure digital analytics is indispensable to your organisation; applying analytics frameworks to your whole organisation; improving your data quality and collection; data insights you can action; and presenting data to get results.


Presenting the keynote is Jim Sterne, Chairman of the Digital Analytics Association, founder of eMetrics and also known as the godfather of analytics. Joining him are two speakers from Google in the US: Krista Seiden, Google Product Manager and Analytics Advocate and Mike Kwong, Senior Staff Software Engineer.


Other leading international industry influencers presenting at the conference include Simo Ahava (Google Developer Expert; Reaktor), Chris Chapo (Enjoy), Benjamin Mangold (Loves Data), Lea Pica (Consultant, Leapica.com), Chris Samila (Optimizely), Carey Wilkins (Evolytics) and Tim Wilson (Web Analytics Demystified).  


Expect to network with other like-minded data enthusiasts, marketers, developers and strategists, plus get to know the speakers better during the Conference’s Ask Me Anything session. We’ve even covered our bases for those seeking next-level expertise with a marketing or technical masterclass available the day before the conference. Find out more information about the speakers and check out the full program.


Last year’s conference sold out way in advance and this year’s conference is heading in the same direction. Book your tickets now to avoid disappointment. 

Event details Sydney
Masterclass & Conference | 8 & 9 September 2015


Event details Melbourne

Masterclass & Conference | 10 & 11 September 2015

Posted by Will Pryor, Google Analytics team

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#NoHacked: Identifying and Diagnosing Injected Gibberish URL Hacking

Today in our #NoHacked campaign, we’ll be discussing how to identify and diagnose a trending hack. Even if your site is not infected with this specific type of hack, many of these steps can be helpful for other types of hacks. Next week, we’ll be following up with a post about fixing this hack. Follow along with discussions on Twitter and Google+ using the #NoHacked tag. (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3)



Identifying Symptoms

Gibberish pages

The hallmark of this type of hacking is spammy pages that appear to be added to the site. These pages contain keyword-rich gibberish text, links, and images in order to manipulate search engines. For example, the hack creates pages like www.example.com/pf/download-2012-free-full-crack.html which contain gibberish content like below:

Cloaking

This hack often uses cloaking to avoid webmasters from detecting it. Cloaking refers to the practice of presenting different content or URLs to webmasters, visitors, and search engines. For example, the webmaster of the site might be shown an empty or HTTP 404 page which would lead the webmaster to believe the hack is no longer present. However, users who visit the page from search results will still be redirected to spammy pages, and search engines that crawl the site will still be presented with gibberish content.

Monitoring your Site

Properly monitoring your site for hacking allows you to remedy the hack more quickly and minimize damage the hack might cause. There are several ways you can monitor your site for this particular hack.

Looking for a surge in website traffic

Because this hack creates many keyword heavy URLs that are crawled by search engines, check to see if there was any recent, unexpected surges in traffic. If you do see a surge, use the Search Analytics tool in Search Console to investigate whether or not hacked pages are the source of the unusual website traffic.

Tracking your site appearance in search results

Periodically checking how your site appears in search results is good practice for all webmasters. It also allows you to spot symptoms of hacking. You can check your site in Google by using the site: operator on your site (i.e. search for site:example.com). If you see any gibberish links associated with your site or a label that says “This site may be hacked.”, your site might have been compromised. 

Signing up for alerts from Google

We recommend you sign up for Search Console. In Search Console, you can check if Google has detected any hacked pages on your site by looking in the Manual Actions Viewer or Security Issues report. Search Console will also message you if Google has detected any hacked pages on your site.

Also, we recommend you set up Google Alerts for your site. Google Alerts will email you if Google finds new results for a search query. For example, you can set up a Google Alert for your site in conjunction with common spammy terms like [site:example.com cheap software]. If you receive an email that Google has returned a new query for that term, you should immediately check what pages on your site are triggering that alert.

Diagnosing your Site

Gathering tools that can help

In Search Console, you have access to the Fetch as Google tool in Search Console. The Fetch as Google tool allows you to see a page as Google sees it. This will help you to identify cloaked hacked pages. Additional tools from others, both paid and free, are listed in the appendix to this post.

Checking for hacked pages

If you’re not sure if there is hacked content on your site, the Google Hacked Troubleshooter can walk you through some basic checks. For this type of hack, you’ll want to perform a site: search on your site. Look for suspicious pages and URLs loaded with strange keywords in the search results. If you have a large number of pages on your site, you might need to try a more targeted query. Find common spam terms and append them to your site: search query like [site:example.com cheap software]. Try this with several spammy terms to see if any results show up.

Checking for cloaking on hacked pages

Because this type of hacking employs cloaking to prevent accurate detection, it’s very important that you use the Fetch as Google tool in Search Console to check the spammy pages you found in the previous step. Remember, cloaked pages can show you an HTTP 404 page that tricks you into thinking the hack is fixed even if the page is still live. You should also use Fetch as Google on your homepage as well. This type of hack often adds text or links to the homepage.

We hope this post has given you a better idea of how to identify and diagnose hacks that inject gibberish URLs on your site. Tune in next week where we’ll be explaining how to remove this hack from your site. Be sure to follow our social campaigns and share any tips or tricks you might have about staying safe on the web with the #NoHacked hashtag.

If you have any additional questions, you can post in the Webmaster Help Forums where a community of webmasters can help answer your questions. You can also join our Hangout on Air about Security on August 26.

Appendix

These are tools that scan your site and may be able to find problematic content. Other than VirusTotal, Google doesn’t run or support them.

Virus Total, Aw-snap.info, Sucuri Site Check, Wepawet: These are tools that may be able to scan your site for problematic content. Keep in mind that these scanners can’t guarantee that they will identify every type of problematic content.

Posted by Eric Kuan, Webmaster Relations Specialist & Yuan Niu, Webspam Analyst

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Google Analytics Conference Nordic in Stockholm, Sweden

Join the Google Analytics Certified Partners for Google Analytics Conference Nordic in Sweden. 
The event takes place August 26 in Stockholm, Sweden, and is followed by a workshop on August 27.
Started based on an initiative by Outfox, who gathered the other Google Analytics Certified Partners, the conference is now returning for the fifth consecutive year.
Our Stockholm conference includes:
 • Case studies from businesses and other organizations, such as The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, Viaplay, and Storebrand. In other words, Google Analytics for sales, entertainment, non-profits, insurance, and more!
 • Expert presentations by Google Analytics Certified Partners.
 • Opportunities to interact with peers and experts
 • …much more!
The conference is being visited by two top speakers from Google, Sagnik Nandy and Daniel Waisberg.
Sagnik Nandy is technical leader and manager of several Analytics and Reporting efforts in Google. He has hands on experience in building, scaling, deploying and managing large scale systems used by millions of web sites around the world. 
Daniel Waisberg is Analytics Advocate at Google, where he is responsible for fostering Google Analytics by educating and inspiring Online Marketing professionals. Both at Google and his previous positions, Daniel has worked with some of the biggest Internet brands to measure and optimize online behavior. 
Besides meeting Google, you’ll meet several Nordic Google Analytics Certified Partners. You will also meet and learn from several end users who use Google Analytics on a daily basis.
To join us in Stockholm in August, visit the conference site and secure your ticket.

Posted by Lars Johansson, Google Analytics Certified Partner and Google Analytics Premium Authorized Reseller

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#NoHacked: Using two-factor authentication to protect your site

Today in our #nohacked campaign, we’ll be talking about two-factor authentication. Follow along with discussions on Twitter and Google+ using the #NoHacked tag. (Part 1, Part 2)

There was once a time when having a relatively strong password or answering a security question was a reasonable way to protect your online accounts. However, according to a study from Stop Badware, stolen credentials is a common way for hackers to compromise websites. Additionally, even reputable sites can fall victim to hacking, potentially exposing your personal data like passwords to attackers.

Fortunately, two-factor authentication can help you keep your accounts safer. Two-factor authentication relies on an additional source of verification, in conjunction with your password, to access your account. You might have used two-factor authentication before if you have ever been prompted for a code from your phone when logging into a social media site or from a chip card reader when logging into a bank account. Two-factor authentication makes it more difficult for someone to log into your account even if they have stolen your password.

As a website owner, you should enable two-factor authentication on your accounts where possible. A compromised account can cause you to lose important personal data and valuable reputation for your site. Two-factor authentication can give you the ease of mind that your accounts and data are safer. 

Google currently offers 2-Step Verification for all of its accounts, including accounts from Google Apps domains. You can use your phone, a hardware token like a Security Key, or the Google Authenticator app to verify your account. These options give you flexibility when traveling or when you don’t have access to the mobile network.

If your hosting provider, Content Management System (CMS), or any type of platform you use for managing your site doesn’t offer two-factor authentication, ask their customer support for an option to use two-factor authentication in the future.They can build two-factor authentication into their own platforms using Google’s open source code. If your platform or hoster doesn’t provide strong protection against unauthorized access consider hosting your content elsewhere. You can see a list of websites that support two-factor authentication, including what types of authentication options they offer, at https://twofactorauth.org/.

If you have any additional questions, you can post in the Webmaster Help Forums where a community of webmasters can help answer your questions. You can also join our Hangout on Air about Security on August 26.

Posted by: Eric Kuan, Webmaster Relations Specialist & Yuan Niu, Webspam Analyst

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Ihwal Masterpoker99

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Introducing the Search Analytics API

With the great feedback from the Search Analytics feature in Google Search Console, we’ve decided to make this data accessible for developers via API. We hope that the Search Analytics API will help you to bake search performance data into your apps and tools.

If you’ve used any of Google’s other APIs, or maybe one of the existing Search Console APIs, then getting started will be easy! The how-to page has examples in Python that you can use as recipes for your own programs. For example, you can use the API to:

What will you cook up with the new API? We’re curious to see how new tools and apps that use this API will satisfy the hunger for even more information about your site’s performance in Google Search! If you’ve integrated this API into a tool, we’d love to hear about it in the comments. If you’ve run into any questions about the API, feel free to drop by our webmaster help forum.

Posted by John Mueller, Webmaster Trends Analyst, Google Switzerland

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